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Quick Air adds the third modern and efficient Learjet 45XR to its fleet

 

German carrier Quick Air recently received its third Learjet 45XR expanding their air ambulance fleet to 11 dedicated air ambulance aircraft. The new aircraft (callsign D CQAC) (Fig.1) has been converted to a flying ICU by Quick Airs own Part 145 maintenance facility ASK Air Service Klausheide. With the experience of the first two Learjet 45XR (D CQAA & D CQAB), which were added in 2018, the whole cabin conversion (Fig.2&3) could be accomplished in house, strategically planned as a conversion package including the installation of a Lifeport PLUS double stretcher system and an individually designed three part medical equipment mounting system. With the new cabin layout a transport of two intensive care patients with two full medical teams including two flight physicians and two flight nurses could be possible which makes this aircraft beneficial efficient. In another cabin configuration with only one stretcher on board up to seven passengers are able to fly beside the patient. An additional benefit of this aircraft is the outer baggage compartment which can easily offer space for up to five suitcases, a wheelchair or a rollator. The Quick Air Team is proud of their latest achievements. “We focus on a modern, efficient and well structured fleet and will continue to invest in its fundamental renewal. This will enable Quick Air to continue to offer a leading product quality and at the same time fly even more economically. Modern aircraft and state of the art medical equipment are an investment in patient safety and in the operational efficiency of the fleet” says Georg Griesemann, Deputy Manager of Quick Air.

Quick Air brings high flow oxygen therapy and humidification into air ambulance service

 

German carrier Quick Air Jet Charter introduces an upgrade to its eight Hamilton T1 ICU transport ventilators. The upgrade includes a high flow oxygen therapy mode providing gas at specific flow rates from 2–80 l/min as well as a humidification capability with the HAMILTON-H900 for greater patient comfort during the high flow oxygen therapy or ventilation therapy. The HAMILTON- H900 humidifier also provides active humidification for adults and paediatrics, as well as neonates.

 

“The main effect of delivering high flow oxygen through a nasal cannula is to continuously flush out the nasopharyngeal dead space, allowing better CO2 clearance and improving alveolar ventilation and oxygenation.”

W. Chatila, Chest, 126 (2004), pp. 1108–1115

“Compared with conventional oxygen therapy or non-invasive ventilation, the use of high flow oxygen therapy has been shown to reduce the need for intubation, and lower the risk of reintubation within 72 hours.”

Hernández G., JAMA. 2016 Mar 15. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.2711

“All our ventilators now offer the option of an integrated high flow oxygen therapy mode for all patient groups. In just a few steps, we can switch between invasive or non-invasive ventilation and high flow oxygen therapy without changing the device or even the breathing circuit. We just need to change the ventilator mode and the patient interface.”

Quick Air adds modern and efficient Learjet 45XRs to its fleet

 

German carrier Quick Air Jet Charter received its second Learjet 45XR in 2018 expanding their air ambulance fleet (Fig.1) to 10 dedicated air ambulance aircraft. Both aircraft (callsign D-CQAA and D-CQAB) (Fig.2) were converted to flying ICUs by Quick Airs own Part 145 maintenance facility ASK-Air Service Klausheide cooperating with a Part-21 design organisation. 26 years of experience in the field of airborne patient transportation shaped the idea of this air ambulance aircraft cabin. The whole cabin conversion was accomplished in-house, strategically planned as a conversion package including the installation of a Lifeport PLUS double stretcher system. Further an individual designed three-part medical equipment mounting system so-called medical wall (Fig.3 & 4) was adjusted to the aircraft cabin. Quick Air is STC holder for the medical wall and is willing to support other companies with their expertise and experience. Additional modifications were completed including the replacement of the standard flooring by a certified, easy to clean and disinfectable rubber floor and the conversion of the first cabin seat to provide wider access for the patient loading ramp system. With the new cabin layout a transport of two intensive care patients with two full medical teams including two flight physicians and two flight nurses could be possible which makes this aircraft beneficial efficient. In another cabin configuration with only one stretcher on board up to seven passengers are able to fly beside the patient. An additional benefit of this aircraft is the outer baggage compartment which can easily offer space for up to five suitcases, a wheelchair or a rollator. The Quick Air Team is proud of their latest achievements.

“With this step the renewal and modernisation of the fleet begins.
Modern aircraft and state-of-the-art medical equipment are an investment in patient safety and in the operational efficiency of the fleet” 

Georg Griesemann, Deputy Manager of Quick Air.

We recently adopted protective measures to protect our patients and personnel from insect transmitted diseases. The adopted measures were triggered by the spreading Zika virus epidemic and are now adapted to all tropical air ambulance missions in our company.

Recently we replaced eight older Zoll M Series CCT units with the same number of newer Zoll X Series CTT models. Considering the Hamilton T1 ventilators and new ZOLL X Series monitoring our investments in new medical equipment place us in the top five companies of the world when it comes to medical equipment.

http://www.airmedandrescue.com/story/1390